CHILD BRIDE OF AUSTRALIA – IN THE NAME OF ISLAM

Written by MJ

Yes, it is permissible by Allah to have child bride’s & it is happening in Australia.

MuslimChildMarriageSydney in Nsw, is becoming a hot spot for Islamic followers & atrocities. Islamic traditions are imbedded into the Qur’an & are carried out every single day. To some, it seems to not matter that we live in a civilized western society. To Muslims they have their law of Allah & western law’s are secondary.

This is to often their defense, Allah permits this, I am a Muslim & it is permissible! They’re happy to live in Australia, but to only live their way according to religious right.

More often than not I hear that it is not happening here in Australia. But that’s completely not the case, it is widespread more predominantly in the Sydney areas & Wollongong is a hot area.

In the late 1950s is where our government went tragically wrong with bringing in a culture completely opposite to mankind, more immigrants began to be accepted from the Middle East. In 1958, under the Migration Act 1958, the dictation test was removed and a new universal visa scheme or entry permits introduced. This allowed non-Europeans to immigrate. Their entry was now based on what they could contribute to Australia and if it could be shown that they could integrate into Australian society. This attracted many professionals and highly qualified people who added to Australia’s relatively small tertiary industry.

The Australian government assisted many of the refugees, such as helping them find work (due to an expanding economy and major infrastructure projects, the Snowy Mountains Scheme being the most famous). This growth of immigration greatly changed the national image regarding the Australian way of life which, before the war, had been dominated by Anglo-Saxons. Immigration was still strict in allowing non-Europeans to immigrate into the country due to the White Australia Policy.

The White Australia Policy began to be abandoned in 1966, under Prime MinisterHarold Holt.[

From the 1950’s onwards our GOVERNMENT’S HAVE ALLOWED this deplorable behavior to exist and grow within our country. Our government’s have no shame, they lack morals are void of any backbone. How many thousands of young girls have been robbed and mentally destroyed over the negligence of our so called leader’s?

Below article 2014-2015.

Groom of 12yo ‘child bride’ in NSW jailed as well as the father now.

This man relentlessly pursued this child via text in late 2013. With month’s of grooming from the 27 year old her father gave permission for them to wed. They found an Imam to perform the backyard wedding, apparently the first man approached refused to perform the ceremony. Which is a good thing to know that not all are deceitful.

It is said their wedding night was consummated in the father’s loungeroom, the father provided a couple of mattresses and pushed together. How romantic? These marriages mentally damage children and they become mentally manipulated in these situations, forever a captive slave.

The Imam who preformed the ceremony was charged only $500. I fee more fitting for a lost dog, not a dog’s act!

A couple of months or so had passed, when the 12yr old complained of excruciating pain.

She was rushed to Westmead childrens emergency department, where it was discovered that she was pregnant. It was an ectopic pregnancy and the girl was in the process of a miscarriage.

As terrible as it is, this miscarriage saved the girl from a life of molestation and saved her life.

The man who married the 12-year-old girl in an Islamic ceremony in Nsw, has been jailed for at least seven and a half years.

The 27-year-old man pleaded guilty to the charge of the persistent sexual abuse of a child after he told police he married the girl in the Hunter Valley in 2014.

He defended it was allowed by Allah & that he did not commit a crime. Luckily the courts protected the child from the parents and they were denied custody.

In 2015 the NSW District Court Judge Deborah Sweeney gave the man, a maximum sentence of 10 years with a non-parole period of seven and a half years.

The father is yet to face court for his involvement in permitting the ceremony. Recently the father has received his sentence of six and a half year’s, in my opinion it is far short.

Written by MJ

http://m.smh.com.au/nsw/muslim-child-bride-was-pregnant-court-told-20150211-13bw8o.html

Child marriage in Australia: A hidden problem. – Plan in Australia

http://www.plan.org.au › Our-Work › Blog › 2…

http://m.smh.com.au/national/child-bride-no-these-secret-marriages-are-child-abuse-20140214-32r44.html

BELOW AUSTRALIAN GOVERNMENT SITE
FORCED MARRIAGE: This website information is governments response to helping children against forced marriage. While the information is great, it is simply not tackling the problem to protect children. They know of marriages in Australia and hospitals that are delivering babies, so where are the arrests? Only this one case above has been recorded in the legal system.
This govetnmrnt information should be AT ALL SCHOOLS in my opinion and in every single mosque, not hidden away on some government site don’t you think?
You are here: Attorney-General’s Department >> Crime and corruption >> Human trafficking >> Forced marriage
For further advice, visit
http://www.mybluesky.org.au, call (02) 9514 8115 or text 0481 070 844. If someone is at risk of forced marriage, call the AFP on 131 237. In an emergency, call Triple Zero (000).
A forced marriage is when a person gets married without freely and fully consenting, because they have been coerced, threatened or deceived, or because they are incapable of understanding the nature and effect of a marriage ceremony, for reasons including age or mental capacity.
Some types of coercion are obvious and easy to identify, including the use of physical or sexual violence, or refusing to let somebody leave a particular place or location until they accept the marriage. Other types of coercion are less obvious because they involve psychological and emotional pressure. These types of coercion can include making a person feel responsible for, or ashamed of the consequences of not marrying, such as bringing shame on their family.
Forced marriage is a slavery-like practice, a form of gender-based violence and an abuse of human rights. Forced marriage is not limited to any particular cultural group, religion or ethnicity, and there are reports of forced marriage from all over the world. Anyone can be a victim of forced marriage, regardless of their age, gender or sexual orientation. While men and boys can be victims of forced marriage, most reported victims are young women and girls.
Australia’s response to forced marriage
Australia’s forced marriage offences
Other laws relating to forced marriage
Signs that someone may be at risk of forced marriage
Forced marriage community pack
Forced marriage community pack documents in community language
Support and advice
Australia’s response to forced marriage
Australia’s response to forced marriage forms part of the Australian Government’s strategy to combat serious forms of exploitation, including human trafficking, slavery, and other slavery-like practices such as servitude and forced labour.
The Commonwealth Criminal Code Act 1995 (the Criminal Code) contains offences regarding forced marriage. It is illegal to cause a person to enter a forced marriage, and to be a party to a forced marriage. Being a party to a forced marriage means agreeing to marry a person who you know or suspect is a victim of forced marriage, unless you are a victim of the forced marriage yourself.
Australia’s forced marriage offences
The crime of forced marriage can apply to:
legally recognised marriages, as well as cultural or religious ceremonies and registered relationships
marriages that occur in Australia (including where a person was brought to Australia to get married), as well as where a person is taken overseas to get married
the conduct of any person involved in bringing about the forced marriage, including family members, friends, wedding planners and marriage celebrants.
The offences apply regardless of the age, gender, or sexual orientation of the victim.
The crime of forced marriage does not include:
arranged marriage—when potential spouses are introduced through the involvement of a third party or family member, and both parties have consented to marry. Arranged marriages are legal in Australia.
sham marriage—a fake marriage willingly entered into by both parties for fraudulent purposes.
servile marriage—where a person is sold or inherited, or where a spouse is treated like a possession, including through ongoing exploitation within the relationship. This is an exploitative practice condemned by the Australian Government and is covered by separate offences.
Australia’s forced marriage offences carry a maximum penalty of seven years’ imprisonment, or nine years’ imprisonment for an aggravated offence. An offence may be aggravated in several circumstances, including where the victim is under the age of 18. If the victim is under the age of 18 and is taken overseas for the purpose of forced marriage, the maximum penalty increases to 25 years’ imprisonment.
Other laws relating to forced marriage
The Commonwealth Marriage Act 1961 includes provisions whereby a marriage may be void if the consent of a party was not real, or if a party was not of marriageable age.
The Marriage Act permits a marriage where one party is aged between 16 and 18 years of age, where there is both the required consent (usually parental) and an Australian court order from a judge or magistrate authorising the marriage. It is illegal for any person under the age of 16, or two people under the age of 18, to marry.
Sometimes children and young people are taken overseas to be forcibly married. This is against the law in Australia and the Australian Federal Circuit Court can make orders to ensure that a child cannot be taken overseas for this purpose. This means that the court is able to:
prevent a passport being issued for a child
require a person to surrender a child or accompanying adult’s passport to the court
prevent the removal of a child from Australia and place the child’s name on the Airport Watch List.
If you think someone is in, or at immediate risk of a forced marriage, call the Australian Federal Police on 131 AFP (131 237). In an emergency, dial Triple Zero (000).
Signs that someone may be in, or at risk of forced marriage
If someone is in, or at risk of a forced marriage, they may find it hard to tell someone about their situation.
A combination of the following signs may indicate that a person is in a forced marriage, or at risk of being made to enter into a forced marriage:
a sudden announcement that the person is engaged
the person’s older brothers or sisters stopped going to school or were married early
the person’s family have a lot of control over the person’s life which doesn’t seem normal or necessary (for example, the person is never allowed out or always has to have somebody else from the family with them)
the person displays signs of depression, self-harming, social isolation and substance abuse
the person seems scared or nervous about an upcoming family holiday overseas
the person spends a long time away from school, university or work
the person often does not come to, or suddenly withdraws from school, university or work
the person does not have control over their income
the person is unable to make significant decisions about their future without consultation or agreement from their parents or others
there is evidence of family disputes or conflict, domestic violence, abuse or running away from home.
It can be difficult to identify the signs of forced marriage and you should seek help and advice as soon as possible. It is important that you always act in the best interests of the person in, or at risk of a forced marriage, including by being mindful of their safety as well as your own.
Forced marriage community pack
The Australian Government, in partnership with the National Roundtable on Human Trafficking and Slavery’s Communication and Awareness Working Group, has developed a forced marriage community pack.
The pack provides information and resources on forced marriage and is available to download below:
Overview: using the Forced Marriage Community Pack [PDF 248KB]
Overview: using the Forced Marriage Community Pack [DOC 37KB]
Forced marriage information sheet [PDF 493KB]
Forced marriage information sheet [DOC 44KB]
Forced marriage frequently asked questions sheet [PDF 510KB]
Forced marriage frequently asked questions sheet [DOC 58KB]
Forced marriage information for organisations and service providers [PDF 1.5MB]
Forced marriage information for organisations and service providers [DOC 140KB]
Forced marriage safety plan and template [PDF 693KB]
Forced marriage safety plan and template [DOC 124KB]
Forced marriage small fold-away booklet [PDF 250KB]
Forced marriage small fold-away booklet [DOC 35B]
Forced marriage fact sheet for media [PDF 261KB]
Forced marriage fact sheet for media [DOC 69KB]
Forced marriage community pack documents in community languages
The frequently asked questions sheet, safety plan and template and small fold-away booklet from the forced marriage community pack are available in the following community languages: Arabic, Dari, Farsi, Somali, Tamil and Urdu.
Forced marriage frequently asked questions sheet
Forced marriage frequently asked questions sheet – Arabic [PDF 182KB]
Forced marriage frequently asked questions sheet – Dari [PDF 201KB]
Forced marriage frequently asked questions sheet – Farsi [PDF 200KB]
Forced marriage frequently asked questions sheet – Somali [PDF 169KB]
Forced marriage frequently asked questions sheet – Tamil [PDF 163KB]
Forced marriage frequently asked questions sheet – Urdu  [PDF 309KB]
Forced marriage safety plan and template
Forced marriage safety plan and template – Arabic [PDF 338KB]
Forced marriage safety plan and template – Dari [PDF 350KB]
Forced marriage safety plan and template – Farsi [PDF 346KB]
Forced marriage safety plan and template – Somali [PDF 314KB]
Forced marriage safety plan and template – Tamil [PDF 384KB]
Forced marriage safety plan and template – Urdu [PDF 540KB]
Forced marriage small fold-away booklet
Forced marriage small fold-away booklet – Arabic [PDF 178KB]
Forced marriage small fold-away booklet – Dari [PDF 209KB]
Forced marriage small fold-away booklet – Farsi [PDF 202KB]
Forced marriage small fold-away booklet – Somali [PDF 162KB]
Forced marriage small fold-away booklet – Tamil [PDF 176KB]
Forced marriage small fold-away booklet – Urdu [PDF 285KB]
Support and advice
If someone you know is in, or at risk of, a forced marriage you can seek help.
If there is an immediate danger, call Triple Zero (000). The Australian Federal Police (AFP) can provide initial advice to people who are in, or at risk of a forced marriage, including where a person needs help to make sure he or she won’t be taken overseas. The AFP can also refer victims for support, including safe accommodation, financial support, legal advice and counselling.
Initial support is available for victims even where they don’t want to assist with an investigation or prosecution. In cases where the victim is a child, the AFP will always act in their best interests. Contact with the AFP can be anonymous if you wish. You can call 131 AFP (131 237) or complete the online form on the human trafficking page on the AFP website.
My Blue Sky is an easy to use website dedicated to preventing and addressing forced marriage in Australia. The website provides people in, or at risk of, forced marriage with important information and links to support services, as well as useful resources for frontline responders, service providers and the general community.
For free, confidential legal advice about forced marriage, you can call the national forced marriage helpline on (02) 9514 8115. The My Blue Sky helpline operates Monday to Friday between 9am and 5pm, with an out of hours recorded message. You can also get help by emailing help@mybluesky.org.au or sending an SMS to 0481 070 844.
The National Sexual Assault, Domestic and Family Violence Counselling Service is a free 24/7 confidential telephone and online counselling service, staffed by professional counsellors to assist any person who has experienced, or is at risk of family and domestic violence and/or sexual assault. You can call 1800 RESPECT (1800 737 732) or visit the National Sexual Assault, Family and Domestic Violence Counselling Service website.

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-1264729/Child-bride-13-dies-internal-injuries-days-arranged-marriage-Yemen.html

Advertisements
Comments are closed.
%d bloggers like this: